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Episode #31: Connecting With Your Husband Despite Distractions with Andrea Jones

By May 26, 2020 Loyalty

Episode #31: Connecting With Your Husband Despite Distractions with Andrea Jones

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What You’ll Discover in this Episode:

  • How to embrace your husband reintegrating after being away.
  • Learning how to embrace chaos and not let it negatively impact your marriage.
  • Discovering both your needs so transitions aren’t as difficult.
  • Finding ways to rekindle love and sex after a time of disconnect.
  • How to remove distractions and refocus your effort on each other.

The Micro Version…you know, like the version of the story you wish your seven year old would tell you about the Lego creation they made:

Sometimes, when life calls, we will be separated from our spouses for an extended amount of time. They leave, and we are at home with the kids, dealing with life, which can sometimes lead to feelings of resentment and disconnect. Today we are talking to Andrea Jones, a seasoned military member and military spouse, who is all too familiar with reconnecting after stressful separations. She’s here to give you tips on how to keep the spark alive and really communicate with your man!

Rather Read It While Sitting in the Carpool Line

Rachel Ballard:

Hey everyone. Welcome to another episode of How to Like your Husband. I am so happy to have you here this week and chat with you about all the things. 

Today, I have an amazing guest who basically was requested through the Facebook group. We had a lot of people asking for help dealing with husband’s deployments or husband’s who travel a lot with that coming back into the home staying connected while they’re gone and, and coming back in and feeling like they were part of the home. So I reached out to Andrea Jones. Andrea grew up as a military child and is now an active duty air force officer and she lives with her military spouse, Brad and son, Tripp. So she understands the military lifestyle from all perspectives, perspectives. She’s created The Military Working Mom podcast to help women that are living the military lifestyle.

 

And so I felt like it was so important to interview her and have her talk to you guys about this. But then as we were having the conversation, I realized how relevant what she has to say is to all of us. So don’t tune out because you’re not a military spouse. There are so many things that she brings to the table that you can apply in your marriage, especially in a time of stress like a lot of us are living right now through Coronavirus and stay home and all of those things. So I want to just encourage you to listen all the way through and get so much great value from her. You’re gonna love it. I know you are. 

 

Hey Andrea, thank you so much for being here on How to Like Your Husband today. I’m so excited to have you and dig into all the things with you. So thanks for being here first.  So I know that your story is long and has a lot of twists to it because of military involvement and backgrounds. So I want you to take a few minutes or all the time you need an hour or whatever and just tell my listeners a little bit about you and your family story and who you do life with and what that’s like.

 

Andrea Jones:

Absolutely. So currently I am an active duty military officer stationed in Missouri with my husband Brad, who is also a military pilot and our new little boy Tripp, who’s nine months, so recently a mom, which brings in a whole new spin of things and ours. Yes. So our story goes back about 10 years ago. So now we have only been married for three years, a little under, but we met back in college in 2010 when we are getting through what’s called ROTC. So our commissioning source into the service. Um, so we met in college, were together for two years. I am not a cradle robber, but Brad is two years behind me. He’s older in age, but younger in school years. But what that meant is when I graduated in 2012, he still had two years left. 

So I got my first duty station in Little Rock.  I moved off there, he stayed back in Texas. We were at the University of Texas at the time. So we started our journey apart. We decided not to get married at the time as Brad was pursuing being a pilot, which means he would move about every year once he commissioned. And unfortunately being two military members, that does not mean I get to move with him every single year because we have to at least be on station two years to move for my career. So we have decided not to get married right away and decided to do the distance, which brings in a lot of hurdles. So I moved to Arkansas and then was there for about two years, deployed, we will be, we’re still not living together at the time. Um, why I was there and deployed. He moved off to Arizona, actually to Northern Texas first to start his training as he commissioned, I came back from deployment, went to Florida. So now I’m on my second move without Brad. Then Brad moved to Texas. It was rough. I’m not gonna lie.

 

Rachel Ballard:

I would say. Yeah, I mean you need a roadmap just to even…

 

Andrea Jones:

Cause people ask me all the time and I’m like were we apart? Four years, six years, five years? I’m not quite sure.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Okay. So I have this little trick I do sometimes if I have to be, um, on a call with a bunch of people and I want to make sure I’m like using all the right names. And I talked to a lot of humans, right? So I’ll put it on a post-it note and like put it on my screen and just make sure that I say the right name at the right time. Um, I would think you would need that for which location your significant other was in. Like, did you just have a reminder of where he is at all times or can you keep that?

 

Andrea Jones:

So we were in contact with each other quite often. But now in order to remember where we were at and what state when one of us was at another, uh, I actually have pictures that one of my friends have done that we have in chronological order of where he was. I was and then when did we get together.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Okay. I love it. That’s fine. Do you have a roadmap in our house? Thank goodness.

 

Andrea Jones:

Yep. So then, uh, where was I? So we’re in Florida. Yes. So now I’m in sunny Florida. Absolutely love it. And I come back from deployment about two weeks later, moved to Florida. So again, military lifestyle style is quite different in chaotic at times. I got back to Florida over the deployment. We had really rekindled our relationship and we can go into all the details later, but we decided to get engaged finally. So it’s been about six years at this time that we’ve been together. Four years apart, finally are engaged. And then six months later we get married in September of 2016. So at this point, we’re not living together yet, still. He’s still in Arizona. I am in Florida. And it’s making that decision. Okay, now we’re getting married. However, because I had just been in Florida for a couple months, um, I can’t move yet.

 

So, and this is the balance that we have to take. Being in the military lifestyle is really planning ahead and knowing what you’re getting into. So when you become married, you finally have to be at a station for one year before they move you. So I knew when we got married, I still wouldn’t be with him. So imagine being apart from someone for so long finally being married. And yet the day after we got married, we split back up and he had to go to a training. So he left the day after and then, um, you know, I just went back home. So it was almost like nothing ever happened and a new driver’s license.

Embracing Distance

Andrea Jones:

So it was really unique in that aspect that we had to figure out how to be in a relationship, a new relationship without anything changing for another year, a little under a year. But needless to say, I always say, so now when I got stationed up in Missouri he came a few months after me and this is a now in 2017. Uh Oh. And you know, it’s, it’s a base that’s very isolated from a lot of towns. I’m like, you know what, I don’t care. It’s the greatest place I’ve ever been. It’s the first place red and I have been stationed together. So it’s almost like a honeymoon. 

 

Rachel Ballard:

You guys are still in it still in the honeymoon phase, right? Except that you had a baby. So then there’s that. Yeah. 

 

Andrea Jones:

So, um, yeah, two years later, so in 2019 we had Tripp. So just this last year and it’s been a whirlwind on how to, uh, you know, become a married couple.

 

So when we did move into each other, it was a whole bunch of being a couple being in a relationship that we had get used to. We are very much independent because we were apart for so long. We were almost 30 at the time, so we had to learn how to talk to each other. How to communicate, how to adjust to each other’s lifestyles. He is very introverted. I am not, and his job, takes him all over the world. Mine does not. So I tend to sit at a desk. So I’m a very much a travel person. Yeah. So it was just reintegrating was really rough and took us awhile. And now that we have a little one, it’s settled us out a little bit. But um, yeah, the journey keeps going and he’s about to deploy again for the second time. And now with the kid, it’s what, what does that mean for me for the next couple of months? Yeah. So that’s our journey. It’s like I said, very chaotic at times. I don’t know where our journey took us, but we are here. We have overcome a lot of obstacles, both in, keeping our relationship alive, um, seeing if it is worth to keep alive over, you know, five years of being apart. But luckily we’re here, so, yeah. What, what are all the questions that are floating in your mind?

 

Rachel Ballard:

Right. So, okay. So I had, you know, I had this whole outline of questions that I put together and this tends to happen. I feel like I almost waste time putting together an outline and then somebody starts talking and I’m like, oh, but this is what I really want to know about. So I’m, I’m going to go on a different path than I was originally planning. But first I would love it if you would tell my listeners, I have a lot of military wives and military women within my private Facebook group, How to Like Your Husband group. And, um, so this was a need that was brought up within my community of talking to somebody with military experience and they could speak to those dynamics as well. So I want you to just tell people, um, a little bit about what you do for military spouses and wives in particular, um, so that they kind of understand why I chose to interview you besides just this like crazy, um, story of how you all are managing and you know, I know you have a ton to offer in those things. And I want to talk about them, but first I want them to know like why they’re, why they’re listening to what you have to say, why it has as much value.

Military Moms and Knowing Choas

Andrea Jones:

Yeah, absolutely. So I have just treated the Working Military Mom podcasts and resource website because I thought I knew everything coming into the military, I was a dependent, so with my parents were in and the ones myself, I become an active duty a member, but I didn’t realize what the toll was when you added on that relationship aspect while adding on a family, once we had kids, and that there was no guidance and obviously, which is why a question coming up on we need people, because in the military it just seems like if you go seek help within the installation, it can hurt your career or hurt your family. So we tend to bottle things up or we’re just kept out of the know, right? So there’s a lot of clearances that go on a lot of information that maybe your spouse or you can’t tell your family about what you do every day and that can bring chaos. So this podcast and website is to provide you with real-life stories, just like we’re getting today, um, on others that are going through exactly what you are. So you understand that you’re not alone.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Yeah. I think that’s the most important part of community. That’s what I love about, um, like my Facebook group and some of the groups that I’m a part of is that it, if it offers you nothing else but just to hear out loud that you are not the only one, that you’re not alone in this, that other people are having similar experience. That can be so powerful. I think as women we tend to feel like we’re the only one this has ever happened to, why is my life like this? And everybody else’s looks so pretty on Instagram and Facebook and all this stuff and that’s just not reality. So I think, um, what you do to put, give that to women and show them, put it in front of their face like, hey, this is happening all over in like, this is how women are dealing with it or not dealing with it.  Or, um, you know, just putting their head down and getting through it or whatever that looks like, that is so valuable, so, so valuable. So you should be super proud of that. 

Okay, so you said something, you’ve said that you guys rekindled your relationship while you were deployed. Okay. And so there will be some that are military that will want to know about that, how you keep that going and then there’s the rest of us that still should want to know about that because basically I think what you’re saying is that you were able to rekindle your relationship from a place of stress, um, and anxiety because I imagine that you don’t have a deployment without some version of stress and anxiety even if you’re in a semi-state safe space. Right. Okay. 

So, um, this is going to be important to everyone because stress is such a huge factor in many lives. And um, right now while we’re recording this, we’re in the middle of, um, the Coronavirus pandemic and all the things that are happening in the United States. Currently I am under a stay home order. Andrea is not yet. Um, so we, you know, we’re kind of like learning how to function through this and the stress is going to come from that. So tell us about that. Tell us how you managed to rekindle a relationship, um, from that mindset, from that place.

 

Andrea Jones:

So in order to say that, I’d have to explain my relationship beforehand. So my love language is very much a physical touch and words of affirmations or Brad is quality time. So when we became apart from each other, hard to do, it was really hard. Um, the first year was a struggle. Second-year was almost worse to where I started seeking out other people’s comfort. Right. So, um, it was almost like I was searching for someone to replace him because he was not around. We saw each other maybe every three months, which is very, very hard. And that’s just for a weekend, right? Not even a long excursion or vacation because for the first two years he was still in school. And then he started pilot training, which is really intensive. So it was bad to the point where we weren’t calling each other a lot.

How to Rekindle a Stressed Relationship

I was hanging out with my friends doing my thing. We were living two very separate lives. We just happened to be in this quote-unquote relationship. And it came to a point where, you know, I noticed I was seeking out other people’s comfort and I had to finally look, you know, this is a couple of years into it is this guy for me? And is it not? However, when you’re living your normal life, you are, you know, still working. You’re still doing all your daily habits and that’s hard to change when it’s something that you’re comfortable, something that you enjoy. So when I deployed, I no longer had any external responsibilities, right? It was just, I woke up, I went to work, I came home, I ate, I worked out. And that was it. You’re in a very much isolated environment and you don’t have a lot of options, which is almost like you’re saying what we’re in now.

We go to work, we come home, we shop for our necessities. Right? And you’re very much in an isolated environment. So when I took out my, my nice to-do’s, my all my responsibilities and my friends, my, you know, just normal routine of things. And I had time to think and dwell. It was really, what am I doing with my life? And why am I pushing a guy that really cares about me and who is stuck with me for everything? Why am I pushing him aside? And we started to call each other, you know, every night we’d FaceTime when we can. Cause sometimes your wifi gets turned off out there when things happen. So for those nights that we couldn’t, um, you know, we’d just make up a couple of days later when it came back on. Uh, but yeah, so it was just amazing how much distraction was actually in our daily routine when we could focus, um, on us and talk honestly.

Removing Distractions and Focusing Efforts

Because just like you said with the text, you know why you have your 50 Texts is because you, you can say stuff without seeing their emotion and when you’re that far apart. And I was gone for six months. I knew, no matter what happened, I couldn’t see his emotion, nor could I feel any wrath, no matter what happened. It was just our relationship was already at a point where it was either going to break or survive and then we chose for it to survive. So anyhoo, that’s kinda how it happened is it just took out all the distractions from our normal life, um, and focus it into a daily routine of, Hey, we are going to talk to each other everyday that we can, um, and make the effort to do so if we wanted this to happen. I think at heart, honestly, both of us knew. And when I came back and we got engaged, Brad even had mentioned like, we probably should have broken up years ago, but I’m glad we didn’t, you know, so we, we both realize our relationship had gotten to a point where we, we’re just going through the flow. I’m just going through the actions of quote-unquote being together. Right. While leading two very separate lives. Yeah.

 

Rachel Ballard:

 And that is something that anyone can relate to. You don’t have to be military to know what it’s like to live a different life than your husband and be like really great roommates. Like we’re in this flow. We each know our role and we’re, you know, going along the path with the semi-similar goal, but, um, to not really be doing it together. And so what I just got out of what you said, I feel like really could be used by a lot of women right now. Like while we’re in the midst of these stay home orders and self-quarantine and all those things like, man, what a better time to remove distractions than when they’ve, a lot of them have been removed for you. Right? So, um, like for our family, there’s no extracurricular activities, right? We don’t need to run kids places. Our boys aren’t working. So they’re home more. There’s nowhere really to go. There’s no girls night to get out to.

Finding a Place to Connect

So, even though there’s plenty of distractions you could have within your own house with social media or television or just, you know, getting hung up in what the kids are doing or that there’s also a huge opportunity for finding a place to connect outside of the distractions. And I think if you get nothing else out of this like that, that can be what you hold on to that right is like focus on the fact that there’s no distraction right now. I love it. I love it. 

Okay. So I want to ask you other questions that haven’t, that have nothing to do with coronavirus or stay home because this was what my community really asked for and why I wanted to talk with you. And, um, so I want to come back to you with, um, how to, how you guys work to reconnect after a deployment and get back into a flow after deployment. I have a lot of women that, um, really struggle with that and I’ll be honest, most of those women I believe are coming from the perspective of their husbands are gone and then coming back. So I know you can speak to it either way, but that’s mainly the struggle I’m hearing from my group.

 

Andrea Jones:

Okay. So Brad deployed not too long ago, so he goes about every year and a half right now, which is awesome. Sarcastic. So we did not have Tripp yet. Um, and because he’s a pilot, it just, it plays a role if you’re actually in a combat zone. Um, so first know that no matter who you are, you’re going to be afraid while they’re downrange depending on the place that they go to because they’re in hazards way anything can happen. Um, but for him specifically, I was under a lot of stress because uh, growing up as a military child on a test base, I had a lot of friends that their fathers had died in planes cause they were pilots. So this was not in the stars for me. So very afraid while he was downrange. Tto the point where if he didn’t call me a day, I would start freaking out. And that’s a lot of anxiety that brings us, brings on, and it plays into the fact when they come home because all we want to do is surround ourselves with them and be with them and all they want to do is decompress.

Recognizing Differences

So you have that conflict that you have to realize is there. Um, so if you haven’t realized that there, don’t flood your husband right away, you know, with activities and um, understanding that he is going to need that time to decompress on what he just did. They work six days a week out there normally 12-hour shifts. So it’s a lot of stress on them as well and knowing, especially if they have kids at home that, you know, kids are still getting sick, they can’t be there for it. So it’s just a lot of emotions that come and play with it. So basically what we did is when he came home, I had nothing planned, which is really hard for me because I’m such a go, go, go person, but just allowed him the grace to relax, decompress, make him his favorite meal and communicate. So we had to be very, very honest. 

That also plays into a lot what I see in on both sides. Right? So whoever’s left at home doesn’t want to tell the spouse the good, bad and ugly to stress out the person downrange cause they can’t do anything about it. Right. The guy downrange or woman downrange doesn’t want to tell the significant other back home what’s going on because the same thing, you know, if there’s a mortar drop or if there’s something going on, they don’t want to freak that person out. But you have to have that line of communication. Um, so you know what each other is going through. So when you do reintegrate, you understand, right? Cause if you think he’s all happy to go, are you the whole time and then you come home, you’re like, you weren’t here for, you know, the first tooth, you weren’t here for fevers, you weren’t here for broken arms and you start focusing on the negatives and you start really jabbing each other and what they weren’t here for.

Keeping Perspective

It hurts both sides cause it just makes you angry, but it makes the person that was gone and feel like they couldn’t help it. Right. They have no control. So it’s just realizing that if you have communication on both sides during the deployment, it’ll bring a lot more um, cohesiveness and understanding when you get back together. But it is hard reintegrating those agendas because as your spouse is gone, you still carry on your normal life. And that is really hard when someone comes back in and we want to say messes it up, but I hate that term because then it’s just, you have that negative right away. Like, Oh my God, you’re coming in here. We already had the role. I’d take the kids to soccer practice, so on and so forth. But you have to realize they want to get involved. So find a way for them to integrate. And if you can before you, they come home, almost figured out a new schedule. If this, if mom or dad was back, what would we do? And you know, almost make that schedule adaptable for them to reintegrate. You have to help.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Yeah. Every, um, every woman listening to this is thinking of a time where, um, their schedule has been messed up by somebody coming back. So, um, and even I thought we were getting out of this, but even right now, like so many of us are having to work from home that those of us late like, um, I have friends who already stay home with their kids or work from home and their kids are usually at school and now their husband is there and their kids are there or their husband is there and their kids are going and it’s just like everybody’s just like, you are totally screwing with my schedule. Like this is how this works and you are messing it up. So I think that’s a really great idea to think about ahead of time. Like what would the schedule look like with dad involved and here for all the things that, I like that idea too.

How to Stay Connected as a Couple

So how do you stay connected as a couple, like beyond just the things for at home though, what you just suggested? What about like the intimacy and the staying, um, strong as a couple, as a unit, not just a team that does life, but as your own little partnership?

 

Andrea Jones:

Downrange or in general?

 

Rachel Ballard:

Um, I want to say like during a deployment right now, but I’d love to know the other answer as well. 

 

Andrea Jones:

Yeah, so we sent pictures because I’d be careful of who’s around when you open up the phone.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Like I’m just going to tell you right now, stop letting your kids use your phone and then let your husband know that you’ve stopped letting your kids use your phone with a fun picture. And then like, just open up a whole new world. You know how I feel about texting? Like just do it. 

 

Andrea Jones:

I’ll normally do a picture and then send a text after it like, Hey, careful, our code word is like pineapples. But um, yeah, so no, it was just rather than just calling and Brad is not a huge FaceTime person, which kills me. But you have to, you have to have that visual where you can see each other and almost like you’re there even though you can’t touch. But there’s so many things nowadays and so woman have given me some great tips on the podcast. It’s called like a Love Box app. So basically you can send mass messages back and forth all throughout the day cause you have to also consider that there might not always be a good time for you guys to talk to each other because of the time difference. Um, so just making sure you have that line of communication and it can be sexy notes, you know. Uh, but yes, that’s honestly we were verbally, verbally sexual, um, as well as through photos and it’s just, you have to do it before I left once. So when I deployed, um, I made a little what uh, boudoir photography or book for him and he still has it to this day. Like I wish he would update it cause I was not in the shape I am now. I’m in mom bod now. I’m like you’re just looking at me while I used to be.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Yeah. Yeah. You just need a new book. Yeah. How would you say that you guys, um, stay connected as a couple right now? What are some of your tips that you recommend with this life that you’re leading?

 

Andrea Jones:

Yeah, so I actually asked Brad right before we got on this podcast of, you know, how we’ve come along, and he definitely has said the communication. So where communication used to be, um, more censored. We are completely honest with each other and we don’t hide anything and you have to.  It takes a lot of effort. I’m not gonna lie, so I’m very much a closed-off person and it took me years to realize that I have to, um, tell them everything and ask. Right. I don’t have to ask him, but I, I need to know in order for us both to be on board with things. And it’s from the tiniest little things like, “Hey hun, you know, I really want to go to this training. I really want to, um, hang out with my friends. You know, it’s just going to be this long. Are you available?” Not telling him and saying, “Hey, I need you to watch the kids. I don’t care what you have on your schedule.” But just having that open line of communication. Now we haven’t been as good with date nights as I would like to. 

 

I will be honest, but we both recognize that and especially with Tripp in the picture, but I’m hanging out, just spending quality time, no matter if one of us wants to or not. And by that I mean I am still a very much a busy body and he’s very much a homebody. So just taking the time to relax and watch a movie with him, um, and try not to double task, try not to have my laptop open and be distracted and like just try to be there in the moment with him. Um, he really appreciates that. But yeah, just understanding what he wants and being there for him so he can be there for me. I don’t know if that answers your question or not.

 

Rachel Ballard:

I think so. I think, um, that, uh, you’re just speaking to being vulnerable with your husband as well and how freaking hard that is. It’s even hard just to say it.

Like I didn’t quite want to get it out of my mouth, but, um, it’s so, it’s so important and so valuable and it brings your relationship to such a higher level and it’s worth it. It’s just hard, you know?

 

Andrea Jones:

And even sexually for him now, um, you know, we realize we have very busy life schedules. Um, and I do love your podcasts because I mentioned to him, you know, when I started listening to, I was like, “Hey, you know, we should schedule in sex as we only have it maybe once every other week. And I, you want it more? I’m just tired. We got a baby.” And he laughed. And now we’ve kind of been scheduling it and like, isn’t it nice, right? Look, look at us go, no, people will come home, you know, work early. He’s like already in bed. Like, “Hey, it’s 3:30, you’re late.”

 

Rachel Ballard:

I like that. I like it very much. If anybody wants that episode is called how your calendar can just save your marriage. I believe so. Definitely go listen to that. And then you’ll also start scheduling sex and having it more. So that’s good for everybody involved. So what are you doing right now, um, to um, make a plan or just be prepared for his next deployment? Cause that is going to look different because you have a kid involved this time. So do you feel like you’re preparing yourself for that in some way and prepare your marriage for it in some way?

 

Andrea Jones:

Yes. So it’s so hard right now just because of, you know, the Coronavirus going on. It’s all up in the air on when they’re going and everything, but it is very stressful. Um, and it is, it does get into fights sometimes right now. Uh, and this is why. So not only again, are we moving after deployment, but we’re moving overseas. So two weeks now, after he gets back from the deployment, we go to Korea. Uh, so it’s more of planning on how to sell the house, how to, you know, take care of the kid while I’m going through that process, how to get rid of everything, when it’s just going to be me. And I know a lot of military spouses deal with that is everything happens when they’re gone. So having my family come in planning that, um, just knowing, getting daycare providers in line or babysitters in line.

Making Plans

Yeah. And yeah, trying to do as much as I can while he’s here. So getting the house ready, making sure we have all the documents needed in case something happens, like power of attorneys, like you almost need a checklist. Like that’s something I should make and put on my website. How to prep because you do need power of attorneys, you need wills. Um, there’s so much to do and time flies by. Yeah. So yeah, it’s just more of right now for us, it’s how do we prep right now and how can I make sure I keep him and Tripp in contact even though Tripp can’t talk yet. So is that gonna be videos, is that going to be, you know, through the books. So there’s the USO when you’re deployed, offers books where you can read and kids hear their voice because he’ll be gone. He’ll actually miss Tripp’s first birthday. It’s hard for them. So he’ll miss his first birthday and then he’ll get back about 18 months a little less. So he has a big timeframe for kids to develop and understand who dad is and all that. So making sure Brad doesn’t feel like he’s missing out. So I’m just making sure that he contact, like keeping contact with each other via FaceTime. I’m like, I don’t care if he likes phone calls over FaceTime. He needs to see his son.

 

Rachel Ballard:

 

Right. And I think honestly, like as, uh, a mom of many more years, um, I’m gonna tell you like, uh, at that particular age that’s going to be more for your husband than it is for your son. Like this won’t be a blip on his radar. He won’t even remember, um, this particular deployment. Obviously there will be many more to come. But um, but yeah, keeping your husband connected where he doesn’t feel like he’s coming home a stranger will be, um, important. So. Okay. Well I want to, I want to first of all say, I hope that you’ll come back on, cause I have a lot more questions but also want to be respectful of everyone’s time here. So can you tell everybody, um, where they can find you and I’m a little, just a little bit about where they can reach out if they need assistance as well.

 

Andrea Jones:

Yeah, absolutely. So if you have any questions or anything, you can email me [email protected] or you can go chat on our Facebook site or the website. Just reach out there and listen in to our podcast and see this and hear the stories of women that are going through exactly what you’re going through, no matter if you’re a pregnancy or into motherhood.

 

Rachel Ballard:

Yeah, absolutely. I think that that is so important and powerful. If you guys hear nothing else, it’s the, you need to seek out community of people that are in similar situations. I’m not in a way that it brings you down, but in a way that it, uh, provides for you. Uh, the opportunity to see that you’re not alone, that you know somebody else is going through this and, and doing it successfully. Um, and that you can too, right with, with help from your friends. So, um, thank you so much for being here today. I appreciate it so much. I, I know that we’ll have a ton more questions for you, so hopefully we’ll be able to get you back on at another time and good luck with the upcoming deployment. I know that’s going to look a little different this time, so thank you so much.

Can’t get enough? I’m linking her info below so you can keep listening and following along with this amazing woman’s journey!

Where to Find Andrea Jones:

Website: www.themilitaryworkingmom.com

Podcasts:  ApplePodcast  Spotify  Stitcher

FB: The Military Working Mom

IG: The Military Working Mom

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